In This Review

Global Trends and Global Governance
Global Trends and Global Governance
Edited by Paul Kennedy et al.
Pluto Press, 2002, 172 pp

These essays argue that global forces are increasing the risks of violence and instability. These risks, in turn, must be addressed by greater transnational cooperation. Kennedy suggests that the international capacity to deal with coming global problems hinges on the fate of emerging states -- such as India, China, Mexico, Brazil, and Indonesia -- and their ability to join the advanced world as rule-based and cooperative partners. Another essay usefully identifies the cross-border challenges posed by globalization. But the book is most intriguing when the authors try to pin down the meaning of global governance, defined here as the sum total of world regulatory policies and mechanisms that guide the interaction of economies and societies. With the rise of multinational business, economic interdependence, and nongovernmental organizations, the authors argue, the old state-centered governance structures are giving way to decentralized regulatory processes. Coordination will become increasingly complex as intergovernmental bodies operate with less formal, self-regulatory groupings. The book makes a reasoned case for a more rule-based, multilateral governance system, but it passes a bit too quickly over the question of whether national interests and values can support such a future.