In This Review

A Diary Between Friends
A Diary Between Friends
By the Government of Canada
McClelland & Stewart, 2002, 138 pp.

In the immediate aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11, many old illusions were shattered, and not least in the western hemisphere. In contrast to the immediate outpouring of heartfelt sympathy from U.S. allies in Europe, there was a deafening silence from south of the U.S. border. When most Latin American leaders did make some expression of outrage and support, it came grudgingly and late. But no such qualification was apparent to the north, and this book is a moving tribute to the Canadian reaction. Here is the story, in words, interviews, and photographs, of the 10,500 airline passengers diverted to Gander, Newfoundland, and how that tiny town responded to the crisis. It is the story of how Americans stranded in Canada coped as they became aware of the cause of their forced and unanticipated northern sojourn, and how the outpouring of support by Canadians grew over the course of the following weeks. This memorable tribute to a relationship too often taken for granted shows how a moment of unprecedented tragedy demonstrated, in the words of U.S. Ambassador Paul Celucci, that the "differences that divide us are far, far less important than the ties that bind us."