In This Review

The Cambridge History of Russia. Volume 3, The Twentieth Century
The Cambridge History of Russia. Volume 3, The Twentieth Century
Edited by Ronald Grigor Suny
Cambridge University Press, 2006, 866 pp.

With 27 authors, writing on 25 different topics, this muscle-toning volume of over 800 pages covers every subject from Russia on the eve of the 1917 revolution to, albeit briefly, the early Putin era. The wars (the First, the civil, and the Second) and the eras (Stalin, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, Gorbachev, and Yeltsin) each receive separate treatment. In between, so do Russia's twentieth-century economic and demographic changes, as well as the fate of peasants, workers, women, non-Russians, and key republics. And there are chapters on science and technology, culture, and foreign policy. The heavily laden table is introduced by a reflective essay written by Suny, the impresario for this feast, on the way Westerners have read Russian and Soviet history from one era to the next. This book is a fitting finale to a distinguished set of volumes that starts with "From Early Rus' to 1689".