The Berlin-Baghdad Express: The Ottoman Empire and Germany's Bid for World Power

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The Berlin-Baghdad Express: The Ottoman Empire and Germany's Bid for World Power
By Sean McMeekin
Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010
496 pp. $29.95
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This is the story of Germany's plans to bring the Ottomans into World War I and then to play the jihad card against the Allies, which held most of the Muslim world in colonial thrall. It is good, old-fashioned history as biography. Kaiser Wilhelm II, the mercurial archaeologist Max von Oppenheim, and "the Three Pashas," Cemal, Enver, and Talat, loom large. But many others -- friends, foes, and would-be Muslim recruits to jihad -- are also well delineated. In telling the story of the Central Powers' less-than-successful recruitment of locals, from Libya to Arabia to Afghanistan, McMeekin demonstrates the fragility of this jihadist dream. And his accounts of the victory over the Allies at Gallipoli and the failure to complete the Berlin-Baghdad rail line nail down the greater importance of military skill and geopolitical givens in determining outcomes. A secondary theme is Germany's contradictory flirtation with Zionism, which McMeekin returns to in his epilogue, "The Strange Death of German Zionism and the Nazi-Muslim Connection."