Chocolate Wars: The 150-Year Rivalry Between the World's Greatest Chocolate Makers

In This Review

Chocolate Wars: The 150-Year Rivalry Between the World's Greatest Chocolate Makers
By Deborah Cadbury
PublicAffairs, 2010
384 pp. $27.95
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This is the story, initially set in the nineteenth century, of seven chocolate makers -- three English, one Dutch, two Swiss, and one American -- struggling to produce salable products. Eventually, determined entrepreneurs met the technical challenges of converting a bitter bean into the many delicious forms of chocolate familiar today. The three English firms -- Fry, Cadbury, and Rowntree -- were run by Quaker families, and the founder of the American one, Milton Hershey, had gone to a Quaker school. All the companies were imbued with a strong sense of social responsibility, founding orphanages, creating model towns, and engaging in other good works as they prospered. The main focus of Chocolate Wars is Cadbury (sold to the American company Kraft Foods in 2009), whose managers found themselves, among other activities, combating slavery in Portuguese Africa in the early twentieth century and devising a code for good corporate governance more recently.

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