In This Review

Evangelicals and American Foreign Policy
Evangelicals and American Foreign Policy
By Mark R. Amstutz
Oxford University Press, USA, 2013, 272 pp.

With the recent emergence on both the left and the right of strong populist opposition to the postwar internationalist consensus, the United States is embroiled in what could be its most searching foreign policy debate since the start of the Cold War. Put on the defensive, liberal internationalists and national security conservatives alike are casting about for new allies as old assumptions and policies come under attack. Amstutz’s book represents a timely intervention, highlighting the ideas and priorities of a politically significant constituency that might provide critical support for those who believe that U.S. security and prosperity still require deep global engagement. Today’s evangelicals combine, on the one hand, global concerns and humanitarian values that resonate with many liberal internationalists and, on the other, pro-market and antistatist inclinations and ideas on sexual morality that diverge from the liberal conventional wisdom. The portrait Amstutz draws of evangelical foreign policy activism and thought does not always flatter his subject; he is frank about some of the theological, intellectual, and institutional challenges that face American evangelicals seeking to influence U.S. policy and world events.