Peacekeeping in Africa: Politics, Security, and the Failure of Foreign Military Assistance

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Peacekeeping in Africa: Politics, Security, and the Failure of Foreign Military Assistance
By Marco Jowell
I.B. Tauris, 2018
288 pp.
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As Western countries have come to rely on African militaries to carry out peacekeeping operations, a complex web of training facilities for peacekeepers and programs to improve cooperation between armed forces has emerged, mostly funded by Western donors. At the core of this system are a small number of training centers. In this book, Jowell, a former analyst at the International Peace Support Training Center in Kenya, uses officer-training programs as a lens through which to analyze the logic and effectiveness of peacekeeping. The picture is not pretty, but it is instructive. Curricula at training centers are poorly designed. Participants are often attracted more by the stipends they receive and by opportunities for career advancement and foreign travel than by a desire to learn. Western donors pump in a great deal of money, but they show little concern about the low quality of the training. Yet Jowell shows that despite all these shortcomings, these training centers are creating a pan-African military ethos by forging international networks of officers with shared experiences and a common language.

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