In This Review

Computer Wars: How the West Can Win in a Post-IBM World

Computer Wars: How the West Can Win in a Post-IBM World
By Charles H. Ferguson and Charles R. Morris
272 pp, Times Books, 1993
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The Highest Stakes: The Economic Foundations of The Next Security System

The Highest Stakes: The Economic Foundations of The Next Security System
By Wayne Sandholtz and others
262 pp, Oxford University Press, 1992
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The Next Battleground: Japan, America, and the European Market

The Next Battleground: Japan, America, and the European Market
By Tim Jackson
332 pp, Houghton Mifflin, 1993
Purchase

By the close of the administration's first 100 days, President Bill Clinton's trade policy had come under heavy fire at home and abroad. Referring to the international shouting matches over computer chips, steel, minivans, aircraft manufacturing and government procurement contracts, The New York Times wrote of "a growing tension in trade relations provoked by President Clinton's new and more confrontational approach to international negotiations." The Wall Street Journal accused the administration of caring "less about principle than about making a political deal." The Economist called Washington's approach "at best incompetent and at worst a step down a slippery path towards protectionism." And The Financial Times urged Europe to side with Japan against America's new trade initiatives.

European Community ministers talked of America's "unilateral bullying" and of "having to grope in the dark" to figure out what the new Clinton team was trying to do. Japan's ambassador to theECwas more polite, saying

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