U.S. President Donald Trump’s efforts to liberate Venezuela from Nicolás Maduro’s regime have stalled, despite some unusually favorable circumstances, including a spectacularly incompetent government in Caracas, a restive population, a regional consensus in favor of regime change, and the presence of a widely recognized and constitutionally legitimate successor. The Trump administration has followed the same playbook in Venezuela as in Iran and North Korea: maximal demands, tightened economic sanctions, and vague threats of military action. It hasn’t worked in any of the three cases, although all three countries are feeling the pain.

The centerpiece of

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  • JAMES DOBBINS is a Senior Fellow and Distinguished Chair in Diplomacy and Security at the RAND Corporation and former Special Assistant to U.S. President Bill Clinton for the Western Hemisphere.
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